Five Most Dangerous Cities In America

According to 2010 data, the metropolitan areas of Detroit and Memphis topped Forbes’ annual list of “America’s Most Dangerous Cities.” The list gathered data from the FBI’s 2010 crime report and focused on metropolitan statistical areas (MSA), large cities with suburbs surrounding them, of populations north of 200,000. Forbes compiled the list according to data the FBI categorizes as violent crimes, consisting of murder, non-negligent manslaughter, forcible rape, robbery and aggravated assault.

For new visitors, please note this list was published in 2012. You can find updated articles about 2013′s most dangerous cities ranked by:

This list focuses on property crimes—burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft. These five MSA have over 5,000 property crimes per 100,000 inhabitants and all of them have robbery crimes over the national average (the only large MSA with over 5,000 property crimes to not make the list is Spokane, WA with 5,039.2). The US as a whole has a property crime rate of 2,941.9.

Note:

  • All numbers are per 100,000 residents
  • If a crime is both a violent crime and property crime, it is recorded as a violent crime.


5) Fayetteville, NC

With a property crime rate of 5,221.4 and a robbery rate of 168.8, the Fayetteville, NC area, which includes Cumberland and Hoke Counties, starts off the list as the best of the worst. The area is best known as the home of Fort Bragg, a major US Army base, and the Pope Army Air Field, both located in the city of Fayetteville. In 2008 the city was

Because of its high property crime rate, many Fayetteville residents use home security systems for protection. Learn how to protect your home with a personal monitoring adviser now.declared “The World’s First Sanctuary for Military Families” and TIME magazine declared it “America’s Most Pro-Military Town”. Despite the military presence, the city of Fayetteville has a property crime rate over double the national average—6,033. Fayetteville’s robbery rate of 168.8 is higher than the national average.


4) San Antonio, TX

The Greater San Antonio region is the largest MSA to make the list—boasting over 2 million citizens—and is a popular tourist destination, with over 20 million tourists visiting the city every year. The population as a whole has a property crime rate of 5,233.1, due largely to crimes in the city of San Antonio. San Antonio differs from other large cities in that it doesn’t have independent suburban cities surrounding it, causing a high density rate inside the city which could be a factor affecting the crime rate.


3) Macon, GA

Macon, GA is the first of two Georgia MSAs to make the list. Including Bibb, Crawford, Jones, Monroe and Twiggs Counties,Macon has a property crime rate of 5,334.1 and a robbery rate of 155.6. The median household income in the city is $27,405 and over 25.5% of the population is below the poverty line, a probable influence on the high rate of theft.

 


2) Myrtle Beach, SC

Myrtle Beach, SC is a popular tourist destination, attracting an estimated 14.6 million visitors each summer. Its economy is built on the tourist industry; the area has approximately 450 hotels and 120 golf courses and is marketed largely as a family-friendly destination. Largely unbeknownst to tourists, the city of Myrtle Beach has a theft rate of 113 per 1,000! Muggings and pick pocketing are common crimes against tourists and could explain the high rate of theft, which makes up most of the property crimes in this MSA.


 1) Columbus GA

Columbus, GA is this years property crime capital, with the highest property crime rate in the nation—5,824.6. The MSA includes Chattahoochee, Harris, Marion and Muscogee Counties in GA and Russell County in AL. The city of Columbus is home to 64% of the total population, and has a theft rate of 49.1 per 1,000 residents and a burglary rate of 18.8 per 1,000 residents.

Whether you live in the most dangerous city in America or the least, a home security system provides an extra layer of protection against property crime and the psychological trauma that accompanies it. Learn how to protect your individual home with the free, quick personal monitoring adviser.

Do you live in one of these cities? Leave us a comment or tweet us your thoughts with the hashtag #MostDangerousCity.

93 thoughts on “Five Most Dangerous Cities In America

  1. Tyler Faulkner

    You cant tell me Flint Michigan or Detroit or Chicago or Memphis or Birmingham aren't 10 times worst than Macon Ga. Are you serious?

    Reply
  2. Chris Floore

    That isn't representative of Macon in the city limits or even Bibb County. It's actually our MSA, which includes several other counties. If they were just looking at Macon, we wouldn't even qualify for the list since we have 90,000-ish people and they looked at areas of 200,000 or more. Also, it's old data and is based on a study that is called in to question every year.

    Plus, they're trying to sell you an alarm system, so they only look at property crimes.

    Reply
  3. Charala Hewitt

    Actually, it's probably not just because they are so close, but the so many people in the Russell County area get arrested in Columbus and vice versa.
    The Phenix City area was known to be 'sin city'' back in the day. There is actually a movie about the place called the 'The Phenix City Story'.

    Reply
  4. Gwendolyn Allen

    Why even respond to Giorgio McCool? With a name like that, you can tell his whole purpose in life is to obtain as much attention as possible. LOSER! LOL!!

    Reply
  5. Mary Oppy

    I lived in Macon from 1981-85, moved back in 1990. The GA Academy for the Blind has put up a fence! We have a home alarm system. 1 -Best protection is a fully charged cell phone at your bedside – if you even think someone is breaking in call 911. 2- Keep a super bright LED flashlight at your bedside – if someone enters your bedroom, BLIND them with the light.3 – If you don't know how to use it , Don't get a gun! a 9 iron works well at close quarters, but you might do better to hide in the closet or bathroom with the cell phone and the flashlight. 4- a barking dog is a warning – a biting dog is a lawsuit! We are hoping our new consolidated gov't will help, but change for the better always seems too slow. And the schools are still in turmoil.

    Reply
  6. Tim Fowler

    Bradley Williamson
    how many times have you walked Broad St., Cherry St., Poplar St. 2nd and 3rd St.'s, Spring St. after dark with your wife/girlfriend?
    you ought to try it sometime, then report back with you findings. if you're able.
    Macon is NOT the same City i knew when i moved to Jones Co. 26 years ago….even back then, i'd not venture "downtown" after dark.

    Reply
  7. Tim Fowler

    Meghan Meyer von Bremen

    two of my four daughters are associated with Wesleyan College, one works at Wesleyan (graduated class of '11) and one is presently a sophomore. and my fourth daughter will start classes there next year.
    i don't really worry about them while they're "on campus", then on the other hand, I DO, in today's times, women/girls need to be cautious wherever they are ….but, they travel Vineville to 75N to 16E to Spring Street to Gray Hwy. to get there and to come home to Jones Co. it's their route to-n-fro that i worry about them. there is wickedness and evil in those parts of town.

    i tell them to travel Forsyth Rd. to Bass Rd. to 87 to 18E to-n-fro. that's the way I go. it's a bit further, 27 miles, but it's a lot safer.
    you know how li'l girls are, once they get grown…they don't listen to Dad anymore.

    i go to Macon myself just as little as possible…only for Dr.'s appointments or to the hospital, the Med Center and/or the Coliseum. and i'm always carrying my weapon.
    but…I do that most anywhere I go other than church.

    Reply
  8. Tim Fowler

    **Property crime (July 2013): Myrtle Beach, Macon, Hot Springs, Fayetteville, Columbus**

    hmmmm…did you read the date on this list?

    Reply
  9. Gary Smith

    Meghan Meyer von Bremen I love North Macon. I'm not sure what all them other folks are talking about but this is a add for burgulary alarm company anyway.

    Reply
  10. Debbie Hayes Mashburn

    Any list that doesn't include Chicago, Detroit or Los Angeles has got to be off somewhere……???

    Reply
  11. Wally Scarborough

    I am so glad to hear someone say something good about Macon, most folks on Facebook are running it down. Yes, there are some places you have to be aware of but there are so many nice places that puts towns around Macon to shame.

    Reply
  12. MikeandDanielle Marsolais

    I loved in Columbus for five years. I was never a victim of a crime but maybe that was because I carried firearm at all times. Concealed mostly but always made sure if you looked you would be able to tell I had it on me.

    Reply
  13. Jennifer Smith Garrett

    I happen to love Macon, GA! It's a beautiful city rich in history. It will always be my hometown and I still live here! If you haven't been here in years or didn't grow up here, and are only going by what you hear or read about it on the news, then you are really missing out on a good thing. Much love!

    Reply
  14. Jim Sandefur

    I copied the following reply to the above from Sharon's reply to the above posted elsewhere:

    the two things you cited are right on target..and there are plenty more similar things that could be mentioned. since this list is from 2010, i went directly to the forbes site and macon isn't on their most current list of top ten dangerous cities..though it well may still be high on the FBI list of statistics that the report was taken from. it's all well and good to keep in mind your city's good points..but the only way to actually improve it is to not turn a blind eye to what makes it miserable and dangerous. so..basically i like what you said dude. too much rah rah rah only keeps the emperor thinking hes really wearing clothes.

    Reply
  15. Jim Sandefur

    Let's not forgot that while other cities, like Memphis recently, will spend whatever it takes to rescue trapped animals, Macon's solution to a 3-legged dog named Lucky getting trapped in a sewer was to let it starve to death so it could be pulled out in pieces. This was to save the couple of hundred dollars it would have cost to cut a hole in the sidewalk. And, in Macon, during the day Judge Simms is tough on drunk drivers but at night continues to drive drunk after being pulled over twice for driving drunk and let go.

    Reply
  16. Bradley Williamson

    Wow. I've been to Macon and it isn't the nicest town around. For sure. But man, this Giorgio guy is a character! He obviously has some deep rooted anger and insecurity that manifests itself into hateful, hateful insults. Look at the way he throws around slurs aimed at homosexuals and blacks. Ridiculous. It's one thing to say Macon is a struggling urban city that is continually oppressed by poverty and racist attitudes. It's another thing to reference water melons and fried chicken (as if he has never had either). And Jerry Curl? – For real?? I haven't seen a JHERI CURL in forever. Maybe this reference is related to his own baldness. Everybody is a badass when hiding behind a keyboard.

    Reply
  17. Sharon Clabo

    the two things you cited are right on target..and there are plenty more similar things that could be mentioned. since this list is from 2010, i went directly to the forbes site and macon isn't on their most current list of top ten dangerous cities..though it well may still be high on the FBI list of statistics that the report was taken from. it's all well and good to keep in mind your city's good points..but the only way to actually improve it is to not turn a blind eye to what makes it miserable and dangerous. so..basically i like what you said dude. too much rah rah rah only keeps the emperor thinking hes really wearing clothes.

    Reply
  18. Jim Sandefur

    Let's not forgot that while other cities, like Memphis recently, will spend whatever it takes to rescue trapped animals, Macon's solution to a 3-legged dog named Lucky getting trapped in a sewer was to let it starve to death so it can be pulled out in pieces. This was to save the couple of hundred it would have cost to cut a hole in the sidewalk. And, in Macon, during the day Judge Simms is tough on drunk drivers but at night continues to drive drunk after being pulled over twice for driving drunk and let go.

    Reply
  19. Ken Jones

    THIS INCLUDES PROPERTY CRIMES FOR THE MOST PART.NO MURDERS, NOT RAPES…………..SO MACON IS AS SAFE AS ANYWHERE OTHER THAN BOISE, MT.MY ISSUE YOU CAN MOVE, THIS IS FREE A FREE COUNTRY TO MOVE.

    Reply
  20. Teresa Wells Vandunse

    have never known Macon to be attractive either girlfriend, but I agree with what you said, they talk about Houston Co/WR vs Macon alot on Mix in the morning, they always compliment WR and have alot of negative comments toward Macon

    Reply
  21. Kirstie Hale

    How the hell is this true? Columbus, Georgia is more dangerous than Detroit, Michigan? I have a very hard time believing this article. I live in North Columbus, and I feel very safe at home.

    Reply
  22. Trent Sells Homes

    I live in macon but rest assured I always have something on my hip to ensure im never a statistic. Attempting to rob me and leave in one piece is very unlikely. In my opinion Macon is not bad. I have definately lived on worse.

    Reply
    1. buck myers

      out of all the cities, towns, and states I have lived in, Macon is by far the worst. ONLY thugs and gangsters and wannabes think it’s not that bad. There have been three shootings in the last week alone, not to mention all the other crimes.

      Reply
  23. Natasha Hubbard

    It's such a shame what the city government in Macon has allowed to happen to that beautiful city. I was born and raised in Macon and it will ALWAYS hold a special place in my heart…but I wouldn't live there now for any amount of money. I live 20 minutes down the road in Warner Robins, a much less attractive but much safer city. Not without it's problems, mind you, but it's the difference in 3 murders a year vs. the 30 – 40 per year Macon has.

    Reply
  24. Clayton Earl Eichelberger

    Went to law school in Macon and never want to go back. Most outwardly racial hostile area I have ever seen. The n-word is thrown around more casually then sweet tea and don't even ask about the police force. Certain areas clean up very nicely but when your downtown has a bronzed "colored section" marker on its own train station, well I am just not surprised by this thread.

    Reply
  25. Joshua Scott

    Any body notice this. All are around military bases except for one. So is it coincedntal that crime follows military bases because they know people have things?

    Reply
  26. Ricky OmLight

    "This list focuses on property crimes—burglary, larceny-theft and motor vehicle theft." The data isn't recent either…2010…so this hardly qualifies as a MOST DANGEROUS list…more like a most ANNOYING list.

    Reply
  27. Mike Asbell

    They're going based on percentage per capita, not actual crime numbers. Because Atlanta has a large number of people, that brings their percentage down. This list is not a good representation, although I think we can all agree that Macon sucks and that it is the second arm pit of Georgia with Atlanta being our first arm pit.

    Reply
  28. Heatherly Wakefield

    Note the article is about property crimes, not murder rates. It also reads like a huge ad for getting a home security system. Not surprising since it's a blog on a home security site. It's also presenting information that was gathered in 2010, not current statistics.

    Reply
  29. James Reid

    Don't worry Flint's capable of being highly ranked if not first b4 September. And don't forget if not by then Labor day weekend should clinch it for us.Its not like They haven't been there b4. I'm guessing that there might be a shortage of ammunition. Or perhaps summer vacations are the Root of the problem.

    Reply
  30. Tedra Sanders

    The fact that Macon is on this list is not surprising what so ever. I went to a school down there and heard police sirens day in and day out.

    Reply
  31. Bethra Szumski

    I think it's funny that a lot of folks that live in those GA towns are all freaked out about big scary Atlanta.

    Reply
  32. skelo

    I live in columbus , ga. The area seems safe as I liveon the north side which is the safer side of town. However, riding through the south side or the east side reminds me of parts of new Orleans’ high crime areas. Seems to be a thriving drug culture here centered around being a gangster drug dealer. Everyone wants easy money I guess. :/

    Reply
  33. Craig Teller

    I live in Myrtle Beach SC, a block from the beach in a nice neighborhood. Two weeks ago in the early morning hours, I heard a loud noise, looked out my window and saw a man carrying a large flat screen TV down the street. I called the police and we discovered two of the six homes on my street had been broken into and two more in the neighborhood. I was able to ID the individual and he is in custody for 25 burglaries. I started a Neighborhood Watch and now have 75 homes participating. Through this program we are getting neighbors to know one another and watch out for threats to the community. In a few short weeks, I have seen a very diverse neighborhood pull together. Personally, I have LiveWatch and am very glad I made that investment.

    Reply
  34. Dave

    I used to live near Fayetteville, NC. I never experienced any problems, but maybe I was too far away. I agree with Best Security, it’s amazing that a lot of tourist cities don’t make the list.

    Reply
  35. World's most dangerous cities

    Nice information. I have learned allot from your article.

    i never knew that macon, ga had 155.6 robbery rate in the city. i been to ga before but never been to macon.

    Reply
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